Tag Archives: every day english

Phrasal Verb of The Day – Drop off

Drop off is a phrasal verb that has a lot of meanings. We’ll see two of those today.

1. If we want to say that we’ll be leaving someone in a specific place:

  • I’ll drop you off at the airport at 7:30 am. Is that OK for you?

2.  If we want to say something is diminishing:

  • Because the rains this year have been scarce, there’s been a great drop off of the water level in the river.

Hope it helps!

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Phrasal Verb of The Day – Come across

My FCE4 course finally started.  We have classes again and new classmates, which for me, is exciting, considering the fact that only three of us made it through the last course. Anyway, let’s move on to the phrasal verbs. This is what happened yesterday.

One of the five FCE  papers consists on Use of English, in which you have four different types of tasks. Again, one of those tasks is called Open Cloze, which is about thinking of a single word to complete the missing gap in the text given. We have several of those type of exercises in the Student’s Book and yesterday  we had a text about the Post-it® notes. The two initial paragraphs went like this: “I had not realised quite how many inventions and discoveries had come about by chance until fairly recently when I was given a book on the subject. I came _______ some very interesting facts indeed. Did you know, for example, that Post-it notes, those small, yellow, sticky […]”. I have to admit the word across didn’t come to my mind (looks like I need to invest more time on phrasal verbs with come, he he he) , instead, I picked the word with. As you already know, it was wrong. The thing is that come across in this context means to find something by chance, to find it unexpectedly.

E.g.:

  • I came across with the solution to that math problem fooling around with some basic formulas.

Hope it helps!

Phrasal Verb Of The Day – Break out

Hi everyone, today’s phrasal verb is break out. How do we use it?

Well, you can use it in cases when something happens suddenly or starts abruptly like a fire, a riot, etc. You can also use it for saying that something is ready for action or use.

E.g.:

  • A riot broke out in prison.
  • Break out the guns, we’re going for a hunt!
  • There’s been a fire break out in the city mall. Firefighters are already there.
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